MOSAIC MEDIA LLC  © 2013  |  Privacy Policy

HOW TO SELECT

Make sure you choose the correct seat for your child's age, weight, and height.


Birth – 12 Months

Your child under age 1 should always ride in a rear-facing car seat. There are different types of rear-facing car seats:

Infant-only seats can only be used rear-facing.
Convertible and All-in-one car seats typically have higher height and weight limits for the rear-facing position, allowing you to keep your child rear-facing for a longer period of time.

Ages 1 – 3 Years

Keep your child rear-facing as long as possible. That’s the best way to keep them. Your child should remain in a rear-facing car seat until he or she reaches the top height or weight limit allowed by your car seat’s manufacturer. Once your child outgrows the rear-facing car seat, your child is ready to travel in a forward-facing car seat with a harness and tether.
 

Forward-Facing Car Seat

Ages 4 - 7 Years

Keep your child in a forward-facing car seat with a harness and tether until he or she reaches the top height or weight limit allowed by your car seat’s manufacturer. Once your child outgrows the forward-facing car seat with a harness, it’s time to travel in a booster seat, but still in the back seat.
 
Booster Seat

Ages 4 - 7 Years

Keep your child in a forward-facing car seat with a harness and tether until he or she reaches the top height or weight limit allowed by your car seat’s manufacturer. Once your child outgrows the forward-facing car seat with a harness, it’s time to travel in a booster seat, but still in the back seat.

Ages 8 - 12 Years

Keep your child in a booster seat until he or she is big enough to fit in a seat belt properly. For a seat belt to fit properly the lap belt must lie snugly across the upper thighs, not the stomach. The shoulder belt should lie snugly across the shoulder and chest and not cross the neck or face. Remember: your child should still ride in the back seat because it’s safer there.

Seat Belt
Ages 12+

Choose a seat with two-piece retainer clips
. These clips are more difficult for a child to unfasten.
The two-piece clips take some dexterity and ingenuity to unfasten. Without these, toddlers may be able to unbuckle and climb out of their seat by themselves.

Look for accessible harness adjusters. All safety seat harnesses adjust, but you want to make sure the adjustments are easy to reach and simple to use. An improper harness adjustment makes the seat less effective in the event of a crash.

It now costs $250,000

to raise a child.


Read More

Sources: Children's Safety Network, 2013. National Highway Safety Commission.

How to Choose the Right Car Seat for Your Child.
Before you head off to the mall – know what to look for!

Look out for flood-damaged cars

for sale after Hurricane Matthew!


Read More

Help support our efforts as a Black Business. Always use Best Black Buys as your portal to Amazon. And tell a friend! Thank You.

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Each car seat owner's manual details the weight and height specifications for that seat.

 
Know The Basic Types of Car Seats …

Rear-Facing Seats: For infants and toddlers.  The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends children ride in rear-facing seats as long as possible. You'll know your child has outgrown the rear-facing seat when his head is within 1 inch of the top of the seat. The old school thinking was that a child is ready for a forward-facing seat when s/he's 12 months old and reaches 20 pounds is outdated. That's NO LONGER TRUE: Height is now the most important concern.


Forward-Facing Seats: Children must be at least 2-years-old or have reached the maximum height or weight capacity of the car seat. Billings explains, "The child has outgrown the seat when the middle of his head (or top of his ears) is above the top of the seat, or when their shoulder level is above the top harness slot."
Booster Seats: Children should be over 40 pounds. Around 8 years of age, they may be ready to graduate to the adult seat belt used without a booster in the back seat of the car -- never the front seat. Check to see that both the lap and shoulder belts fit snugly.

According to a 2013 report by Children’s Safety Network.org, using child safety seats can reduce fatalities by 71% for infants and 54% for toddlers. But unfortunately, 73% of car seats and child restraints in vehicles are used incorrectly. 

Having a car seat that's appropriate for your child's size and age -- and one that has been properly installed is essential, and could make all the difference between life and death.

But before you rush off to shop – know what you’re doing and know what to look for.

BEFORE YOU SHOP …

1. Read your vehicle owner's manual section about car seats very carefully before going shopping. It will guide you to install the seat properly for the make and model of your car.

Car seats can be attached using either the seat belt or the LATCH System (which stands for the Lower Anchors and Tethers for Children system, and which all new vehicles have). You can decide before buying which one you want to use and then look for a seat based on how you want to install it -- belt or LATCH.

If you decide to use LATCH, make sure you know where the LATCH attachments are in your vehicle -- there may not be any in the middle, rear-seating position, even though this is the safest spot for a child. Check your manual to see what your car has.

2. Find out how much room you have in the back seat. A seat with a large base may not fit in a small car -- you may have to opt for one with a narrower base instead.

Get out your tape measurer and size up the depth of your rear seat. Write it down, and take your tape measurer with you so you can make your shopping choice. Also consider who else will be sitting in the back seat. Measure the width you’ll have for the car seat and other back seat passengers and children who will also be riding in a car seat.

    Also Popular In This Issue ...

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

What's the right age to start teaching kids about money?


Read More